Jacob Blesses His Sons — Pt. 1

“And Israel beheld Joseph’s sons, and said, Who are these? And Joseph said unto his father, They are my sons, whom God hath given me in this place. And he said, Bring them, I pray thee, unto me, and I will bless them.” (Genesis 48:8-9)

“By faith Jacob, when he was a dying, blessed both the sons of Joseph; and worshipped, leaning upon the top of his staff.” (Hebrews 11:21)

Seventeen years have passed since Jacob has come to live with his sons in the land of Egypt. One matter of business remains before he dies: the blessings to be pronounced upon his sons. Before Jacob will pronounce his prophetic blessings on the twelve brothers, Joseph, hearing that his father lies sick in bed, brings his own two sons (Ephraim and Manasseh) to him that he might speak a blessing over them. In several ways, these two young men are illustrative of the Christian and his relationship to Christ.

First of all, they are born of two nations for they are both sons of Joseph (and Hebrew by him) and sons of Egypt by their mother, Asenath. Just as the Christian possesses two natures — the one fleshly, earthly; and the other spiritual, the nature we obtain when we become born again of God– these two sons of Joseph have within them that origin which speaks of this world (Egypt) and that which speaks of God (Israel). Yet they are recognized as Israelites completely, even so much that their names shall live on as the progenitors of two of the half-tribes of Israel. Much as the Christian looks toward a hope in Heaven, a place where he has never set foot, these two young men held their hope and identified their own future home as Canaan — a land upon which their own eyes had yet to fasten. Finally, Jacob, the father of Joseph, declares that these men are his own children; just as much as his own two eldest sons were. This speaks profoundly of God’s own adoption of the Christian as His own children (Eph. 1:5). As those born of Joseph become sons of his father, so are those born of Christ sons and daughters of His Father.

In the crossing of Jacob’s hands in blessing the sons of Joseph — the younger being blessed above the elder — we revisit a theme that has recurred again and again throughout Genesis. As Abel was favored by God over Cain, Isaac over Ishmael, and Jacob over Esau, so is the younger Ephraim blessed above Manasseh. What a powerful reminder that God does not look upon things as man does, nor does He choose upon whom His favor shall fall based on the criteria that people do (1 Sam. 16:7). We are often reminded of this characteristic of the Lord in our own lives when He fails to bless those things in our lives that we feel He should. Those skills, talents, and “gifts” that we possess; those persons whom we feel are most appropriate to be used mightily of God are passed over in favor of those things which scarcely have drawn our attention at all. He crosses His own arms and places His hand of blessing on those things which we have placed so little value upon. “Not so, Father”, we tell Him, “for this is the firstborn.” This is the matter of most importance, Lord, this is the thing that ought to be blessed! “I know it, My son, I know it”, He calmly tells us, “But truly this other thing, this younger brother of that thing you are holding so dearly is greater than that.”

To Jesus Christ goes all glory. In service to Him,

Loren

loren@answersfromthebook.org

[This post was originally published November 17, 2010]

All Scripture quotations in this post are taken from the King James Version (KJV) of the Holy Bible

[If you do not know the Lord Jesus Christ or you are not certain where you are headed when this life ends, I invite you to read the article “Am I Going To Heaven?“]

I Am Joseph, Your Brother

“Then Joseph said to his brothers, “Please come closer to me.” And they came closer. And he said, “I am your brother Joseph, whom you sold into Egypt.” (Genesis 45:4)

“I will pour out on the house of David and on the inhabitants of Jerusalem, the Spirit of grace and of supplication, so that they will look on Me whom they have pierced; and they will mourn for Him, as one mourns for an only son, and they will weep bitterly over Him like the bitter weeping over a firstborn.” (Zechariah 12:10)

The foreshadowing in Joseph’s reconciliation with his brothers of Christ’s reconciliation with His brothers is astounding. We have been looking at Joseph’s interactions with the other sons of Jacob from the perspective of the Christian interacting with Christ. But we are also reminded herein of the Lord Jesus’ own relation to the nation of Israel. After all, at this particular time Joseph (who is foreshadowing Christ) is interacting with the whole of the nation of Israel, for the entirety of all the tribes is represented in this room. The ancestors of each and every tribe is present with each brother being the namesake of the tribe that will descend from him.

It is telling that none of the brothers recognized Joseph. The nation of Israel failed to recognize their promised Messiah during His first coming, as well. It is only when Joseph chooses to reveal himself to the brothers that they can know who he is. The Lord Jesus stated plainly to the nation of Israel Who He was, but they did not believe Him (Matt. 23:37). At the first meeting of Joseph and the brothers, they do not realize who he is. It is during their second journey into Egypt that Joseph reveals himself to them.  So it shall be during our Lord’s second coming that He will reveal Himself to a repentant and believing remnant from among Israel. Joseph said unto his brothers, “I am Joseph, your brother, whom ye sold into Egypt.” Jesus will say, “I am Jesus, your Brother, Whom ye crucified.”

To Jesus Christ goes all glory. In service to Him,

Loren

loren@answersfromthebook.org

[This post was originally published November 10, 2010]

[If you do not know the Lord Jesus Christ or you are not certain where you are headed when this life ends, I invite you to read the article “Am I Going To Heaven?“]

**Unless otherwise indicated, all Scripture quotations are taken from the New American Standard Bible (NASB) © The Lockman Foundation and are used by permission.

Judah’s Plea

“And Judah said, What shall we say unto my lord? what shall we speak? or how shall we clear ourselves? God hath found out the iniquity of thy servants: behold, we are my lord’s servants, both we, and he also with whom the cup is found.” (Genesis 44:16)

The musical “Joseph And The Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat”(*) contains a song performed after the silver cup is discovered in Benjamin’s sack called the “Benjamin Calypso.” Some of the lyrics to this Caribbean style number include the phrases:

Oh no – not he
How you can accuse him is a mystery
Save him – take me
Benjamin is straighter than the tall palm tree 

 Oh, yes – its true
Benjamin is straighter than the big bamboo
No ifs – No buts
Benjamin is honest as coconuts

The picture is often painted that the brothers, Judah in particular, were astounded by the accusations made against Benjamin and thus offered to give themselves in the place of this innocent man. Yet in Judah’s very moving and emotional plea with Joseph to take him instead of his younger brother, we see no such appeal to Benjamin’s innocence nor any denial of the crime of which he has been accused. Obviously, we know from the text that Benjamin was innocent of stealing the silver cup; but was Judah convinced of this? Judah and the other brothers, I am certain, were keenly aware that the strength of Benjamin’s character far exceeded their own, but did Judah believe that such an act was entirely out of the realm of possibility for Benjamin to have committed? A young man, away from his simple, rural home for the very first time; entertained in the palatial estate of the viceroy of Egypt, surrounded by gold and silver and jewels that must have staggered the imagination of this shepherd boy. Perhaps, Judah may have pondered, this young man got caught up in the splendor of the moment at the meal where they had been guests and, supposing that such a small treasure among so many others would have scarcely been missed, slipped the cup away in his sack as a souvenir from a place to where he would very likely never return.

Whether Judah pondered such ideas in his own mind or not, we do not really know. But I think we miss something very significant when we conclude that it was Judah’s conviction of Benjamin’s innocence that compelled him to make such a noble gesture as giving himself for his younger brother. This scene is infinitely more touching and of much greater significance when we consider that Judah was offering himself, not based on the merits of Benjamin, but out of his love both for his brother and his father. We are reminded here of the Apostle Paul’s summation of the magnitude of what Christ has done for us in that “God commendeth his love toward us, in that, while we were yet sinners, Christ died for us “(Rom. 5:8). It was not our own merits that compelled the Lord Jesus Christ to offer Himself up on the Cross, but His love toward us and toward His Father. It was not Jesus’ deference to our own righteousness (indeed, we are without any righteousness of our own!) nor His belief in our own innocence; In fact, He gave Himself because we are not innocent!

Judah explained that it was for the sake of his father Jacob’s great love toward Benjamin that he would willingly give himself in order that the young man would live (Gen. 44:30-31). Jesus gave Himself because of the Father’s love toward us.

To Jesus Christ goes all glory. In service to Him,

Loren

loren@answersfromthebook.org

[This post was originally published November 4,  2010]

All Scripture quotations in this post are taken from the King James Version (KJV) of the Holy Bible

[If you do not know the Lord Jesus Christ or you are not certain where you are headed when this life ends, I invite you to read the article “Am I Going To Heaven?“]

(*) Lyrics by Tim Rice, Music composed by Andrew Lloyd Webber. Lyrics used here are under copyright by their respective owner.